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** We will be closing our Front Street store on June 14, 2015- but don't worry! Alison has big plans and ideas, and you should expect to see a brand new shop sometime in the future. Check out our home page for more information, and follow us on facebook for the latest.

 

We'll be adding artist information to this page during our final weeks, so keep your eyes here!

 

 

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ALINE's cardboard

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I really think that we can always find strength, beauty, magic, excitement in the most unusual places… We just need to look at it carefully…

 

 

Meet the cartoniste* behind Aline's Cardboard

Aline Bloch

(*French word for a person who works with cardboard.)

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

In my garage in Issaquah


What do you make?

Most of my projects are furniture, for dining room, living room and bedroom and for kids as well. I also just started working on Home decor like frames, service trays, boxes… and I am falling in love with jewelry.


How'd you get started?

I am French. I’ve been in Seattle-area with my husband and our 3 kids for 6 years.
After our move here, I tried to find the way to combine my creativity and tons of moving cardboard boxes left in my garage. I decided to recycle these boxes and turn them into furniture for my house.

 

Tell us a little more

I love working cardboard because, first of all, it’s green/eco-friendly. Most of the time, I create a piece exclusively with recycled cardboard sheets that I get from neighbors or friends. I do my best to use eco-friendly items and products to assemble and decorate my work.
Working with cardboard is also original and allows for customization. Each piece of cardboard could be adapted in size, style, shape, finishing and color, so that it could fit the room or the taste of anybody. But I don’t think if I would be able to do twice exactly the same piece…
It’s light and sturdy at the same time. It’s all about an internal structure I conceive to make the furniture functional and durable.
I love working cardboard because it is the best way to express my limitless creativity!


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

I really think that we can always find strength, beauty, magic, excitement in the most unusual places… We just need to look at it carefully…

 

Anything else you’d like everyone to know?

Patience, fiddly work and some yelling are necessary to complete a project successfully, but so much fun too! I dedicate myself on every single piece of cardboard to make dreams happen!

 

 

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the SEATTLE SOAP SHOP

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Everything I make is designed to be quirky, useful, and with a bit of a sense of humor.

 

Meet the hands behind the Seattle Soap Shop

Shelly Holbrook-Ebeling

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

The historic and picturesque town of Issaquah, WA


What do you make?

My soaps are all cold-processed in small batches and my skincare products all meet more than one need or solve more than one problem. I try to make things interesting by focusing my energy on making soap like Champagne, Grass Stain, or even Dirty Gardener! I have a line of soap made with BEER and WINE. I make an ‘On-the-Go’ line perfect for busy moms like myself; including an On-the-Go Remedy Stick (a healing balm for cuts, burns, bug bites, and rashes), an On-the-Go Lip Polish, and an On-the-Go Body Butter Stick. My Olive Oil and Jojoba Sugar Wash is similar to a regular sugar scrub, but I formulated it to NOT make your shower slippery and gunky after use. What busy mom has time to clean her shower after taking a shower? Not me!

Everything I make is designed to be quirky, useful, and with a bit of a sense of humor. In addition, it is all Phthalate-free, Paraben-Free, detergent-free (no SLS here!), Soy-free, and with the exception of my beer soap, it is also Gluten-free.


How'd you get started?

While battling a staph infection in my bone marrow (6 surgeries in 18 months) I spent my down time researching the benefits of clearing harsh chemicals (such as parabens and surfactants, etc.) out of my skincare routine. I studied essential oils, butters, and carrier oils and started formulating. After I got my basic skill down, I combined that knowledge with my penchant for all things fun and started The Seattle Soap Shop.

 

Tell us a little more

I use skin loving butters such as Shea and Cocoa Butter, as well as rich oils: Coconut Oil, Olive Oil, Jojoba Oil, Castor Oil, and more. My soaps NEVER have surfactants such as SLS. The bubbles come straight from Castor Oil and Coconut Oil. All of my products are detergent-free, paraben-free, phthalate-free, gluten-free (except the beer soap), and soy-free.


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

I want your skincare routine to be great for your skin and for it to be fun! I am a sassy sort of gal with a wicked sense of humor. I want my skincare products to reflect that quirky side of me while also nourishing your body.

 

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Jennifer Forland Designs

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I love watching enamel melt and love that each piece is a tiny bit different from the last.

 

Meet the talent behind these enameled pieces

Jennifer Forland

 

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

I split my work time between Danaca Design in the University District of Seattle, and my garage and living room in South West Seattle.


What do you make?

I make everything from tiny, everyday earrings to larger artistic necklaces and special occasion cocktail rings.


How'd you get started?

I have been an artist all of my life and took my first 3-D design class in college. It was my first foray into metal. Then, when I worked at a corporate job in downtown Seattle, I discovered a gallery that sold art jewelry. It opened my mind to a new kind of art, and I decided to take classes. My first classes were with Dana Cassara at North Seattle Community College. I continue to work at Danaca Design and take occasional classes there, and have done some in-studio demos as well.

 

Tell us a little about your Process.

Much of my work is with copper, fine silver and enamel. Enamel is a fascinating and difficult material in some ways, but is wonderfully easy to get started with and has such a beautiful range of colors when finished. I love watching enamel melt and love that each piece is a tiny bit different from the last. I am also experimenting with precious metal clays, keum boo (heavy gold leafing on silver), and cast bronze, brass and silver.


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

I’m in love with love, nostalgia, and the beauty of a little bit of danger. I try to add a little bit of color, originality and playfulness to my customers day through my work. My current tagline is “Love Every Day” – which can be read as “(Feel) Love every (single) day” or “Love Every Day (because life is a gift)” Life is a work in progress and we should allow ourselves to feel the joy, friendship, sadness and beauty that it entails….ok, that’s enough sappiness now kids. ☺

 

Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

Lord, yes. I guess stained glass is my current “someday” art. But I already sew (and recently did a large fabric and metal installation for a friend’s baby shower) and do image transfer photography using Polaroid-style film.

 

Anything else you’d like everyone to know?

I am REALLY lucky to be able to follow this passion.

 

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Catshy Crafts

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I love working with felt and yarn. More forgiving then paper, they are so tactile and pleasant to the touch that it’s hard to put them down! And the colors available of felt and yarn are practically endless, with new colors being introduced every day.

 

Meet the brains behind Catshy Crafts

Cathy Pascual.

 

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

My home studio in Bellevue.


What do you make?

From hoop art made of felt and hand-stitching to yarn wreaths with one-of-a-kind felt blooms, I make heartfelt décor to cozy up your home. And because I love playing with felt so much, I also sell felt flowers individually and in sets as embellishments for you to use on your own craft projects.


How'd you get started?

In a former life, I was an avid scrapbooker, paper crafter and family memory keeper. My photos and scrapbook layouts have been published in numerous scrapbooking magazines and books. I have always had a drive to be creative and knew I wanted to sell my art. I didn’t set my sights on embroidery and sewing until 2011. My good friend needed an artist to decorate the space of a local cupcake café and she asked me. In addition to paper and felt buntings, scrapbook layouts, and tissue paper flowers, I also started making embroidery hoop art. I had done some hand-embroidery before, but ironically, only on paper scrapbook layouts. Using simple motifs like cupcakes, hearts and flowers, I made several pieces for the space. Shortly after this public showing of my work, I opened up my Etsy shop. Today, hoop art make up the bulk of sales and custom orders.

 

Tell us a little about your Process.

For my hoop art, I usually start with a design or motif in mind – sometimes from a sketch, sometimes without. My favorite motifs are thought bubbles, buntings and of course flowers! Then I choose my felt colors and play with color combinations. My stitching is all done by hand – usually freestyle without a pattern. For my yarn wreaths, I also play with the colors of yarn and felt until I see a color story that sings! Then I know I can begin cutting and sewing my flowers and arranging them on the yarn-wrapped wreath. Sometimes my designs are inspired by my customers. They will give me a motif or color scheme and give me free reign to design something new.
I love working with felt and yarn. More forgiving then paper, they are so tactile and pleasant to the touch that it’s hard to put them down! And the colors available of felt and yarn are practically endless, with new colors being introduced every day.


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

I am passionate about making things that are joyful and uplifting. Having had personal bouts with depression and anxiety myself, and knowing how easy it is to be negative in our outlook, to others and to ourselves, I’d rather lean toward the positive. It takes work to be happy. And based on the general reaction to my work (smiles and squeals and sometimes giggles), I think people appreciate that as well.

 

Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

I would love to try other needlework like crewel, ribbon embroidery and needlefelting. I would also like to learn how to crochet and how to machine-sew. (Just thinking about threading the sewing machine gives me anxiety!) And finally, I’d like to incorporate my first love of paper-crafting into my current craft. Combining the two would be awesome.

 

Anything else you’d like everyone to know?

I will be guest-blogging at the School House Craft blog on various topics of running a creative business.

I hope you will check it out! http://schoolhousecraft.com/blog/

 

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the playful potter

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... I just love the idea that I’ve poured my passion, all my learning through failures and successes, my energy, my heart and more into this lump of clay to make it useful, and now another person will hold it and experience it as more than just a pretty object on a shelf. 

 

Meet the playful potter

or you might know her as Jenn Gavlin.

 

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

I have my wheel set up in my basement cave studio in our U-District duplex, but I’m also a resident ceramic artist at the Kirkland Arts Center where I share studio space with 5 other ceramicists.


What do you make?

Although I dabble in pendant jewelry, when I’m applying to art/craft fairs, I’m in the ceramics category.  As a more general, less medium based area, I would go with housewares.

There’s a soft spot in my heart for functional ceramics.  In the world of art, it’s kind of the black sheep in the ceramics family, but I just love the idea that I’ve poured my passion, all my learning through failures and successes, my energy, my heart and more into this lump of clay to make it useful, and now another person will hold it and experience it as more than just a pretty object on a shelf. 

Stepping down off my soapbox, I make mugs, tumblers, bowls, plates, tea sets, pitchers, soap holders, business card holders, leaf print jewelry… and whatever else I fancy at a given moment.


How'd you get started?

I fell in love with clay the first time I used a potter’s wheel in my high school art class.  In college, I minored in art just so I could get into the ceramics classes I enjoyed, but I feared that jumping headlong into ceramics as a profession would make something I loved just stressful work.  The longer I was in the working world, through several jobs with varying degrees of miserableness, the more I longed to be in a pottery studio.  Living in Chicago with the guy who’d later be my husband and our 2 cats, I began teaching classes at a community art center.  Clay was my drug of choice, and no one was discouraging me, so when we moved out to Seattle, I decided to forgo the day job for the rollercoaster of full-time artist.  There are ups and downs, but I’m a much happier person doing something that fulfills and challenges me daily.

 

Tell us a little about your Process.

Most of my functional pottery begins with a lump of clay on the wheel.  Center, open, pull up, shape, and wire it off the wheel.  Then we wait.  If I’m making a mug, for example, it needs to dry to a stage called “leather hard” – dry enough that it holds it’s shape with a little pressure, but still damp enough for manipulation.  I flip the cylinder upside down on the wheel and attach it, then carve away at the bottom to lighten the piece, and give it an attractive foot.  Next, a handle is attached, and I’ll do any final clean up, carving, extra add-ons before leaving it on the drying rack.  Once my mug is bone dry, it joins a bunch of it’s other friends for a first firing.  Next comes the glazing.  I mix all my glazes on my functional work from scratch, which is a finicky business. If there’s too much of one element or another, the glaze can run, pinhole, crackle, pull, be chalky or just be downright ugly.  If it’s too thick or too thin, same problems.  Glaze formulation takes lots and lots of trial and error, and even the folks who have been doing it forever may not have concrete answers on why something isn’t working the way it should.  But I love having something in the end that feels wholly mine from start to finish.  I dip or pour my glazes to apply, and once the glaze is dry, my mug will go back into the kiln for a second firing.  This time, the kiln goes hotter in order to fire the clay to maturity or vitrify the clay.  That means that it’s taken to the ideal temp for that clay body, where it’s so hot that the molecules become so compacted that they’re no longer porous, making my mug food safe.  Any hotter, and the clay begins to melt.  Sometimes, 2 firings just aren’t enough in my eyes, and I’ll take my mug one step further, adding a decal.  Most of my decals are my own sketches, scanned and printed on special paper.  They’re applied like a temporary tattoo to the glaze fired mug, and then the mug goes back into the kiln for a third firing, lower than all the previous.  We want the glaze to just barely start to melt, for it to become tacky.  The printer that I use, has iron oxide in the toner, which is a colorant used often in ceramics.  The other toner elements burn away, the iron is absorbed into the glaze, and when I pull the mug from the kiln, I have a sepia toned outline of my sketch, held in the glaze of my mug.

Can you tell that I’m also a teacher?


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

Ceramics in general is a lot about the process.  There’s so much to know, so many different skills and techniques, so many different ways the clay can be used.  When I was a kid, my friends and I were not exactly “girly” girls.  We had adventures in the woods, sword fights with tree branches, and playing in the mud got us in trouble with our parents more than once.  Working with clay on the wheel allows me to indulge in that uninhibited side of myself. I hope a bit of that playfulness comes through in my work, and perhaps even causes the corners of your mouth to rise just a bit.

 

Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

I get my chopsticks from a fantastic artisan in Hawaii, who I love supporting.  However, it would be lovely to be able to fashion my own from bamboo, not to mention adding some bamboo handles to tea pots.
I also have a soft spot in my heart for screen printing.
And sometimes I think it would be nice to sell soaps I’ve made with my soap dishes.
Or maybe I could knit some coffee cozies; I did some knitting when I was kid.
I suppose it might be more accurate to ask if there are any I wouldn’t like to try my hand at.  When I was younger, I would go to craft fairs, and be inspired by what other craftsmen had made.  I would think to myself, “I’ll bet I could do that if I got some…” and I have a ridiculous amount of partially made things in my parent’s basement.  I finally learned somewhere along the way that I love the things that I do already and there aren’t enough hours in the day to learn and explore all of the things that maybe might be great.  Now, I prefer to support the people who are already making that cool thing, and, instead, maybe it’ll inspire something in my ceramics in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mayhem Here / Mallory milke Art

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I have been painting since I was a little kid, but never thought of a career in art... 5 years later and a handful of empty paint tubes later, I am here. Painting things I love and get to share!

 

 

We're gonna be honest and tell you we've had a Halloweeny display in the store since we opened (in June.) We love the creepy fun of sugar skulls, crocheted grim reaper buddies, and all the rest of that spooky stuff. As our October window display grows, we thought we'd share one of our favorite sources...

 

Meet Mayhem Here

the work of super talented artist Malloy Milke.

 

 

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

I spend my days tucked away in my makeshift studio, AKA bedroom.


What do you make?

Original Art, Watercolors, Acrylics. I bounce between whimsy, bold animal tangles, and haunting sugar skull portraits.


How'd you get started?

I have been painting since I was a little kid, but never thought of a career in art. As I filled my walls with my own work, I got so many requests I decided to take the dive and go for it. 5 years later and a handful of empty paint tubes later, I am here. Painting things I love and get to share!

 

Tell us a little about your Process.

My animals begin with details; eyes, noses. Then comes the fun part, I begin in a corner and then just go, swirls, tangles, I fill in as I go.


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

I want to be known for my work. I want people to see my work and know it’s mine. I think this is one of the greatest thrills in life- to have people know your work and enjoy it.

 

Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

I have dabbled in paper cutting. I hope to combine this with my tangles.

 

 

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Slide sideways

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We're passionate about living simply and making products that are of really high quality, that will last.

 

Meet Slide Sideways

and the creative duo behind the awesome: Scott and Jacqui Scoggin.

 

 

Where do you make these wonderful things?

We work from home in Tacoma, WA. We have a large loft above our turn of the century garage where all the printing takes place, plus an office inside where all the sewing is done; at least until we can re-finish the garage someday!

What do you make?

We design and hand screen print all our own fabrics and sew them into totes, zip pouches, backpacks, produce and forage bags and anything else we can think of that we want to use for ourselves. We make limited edition silk screened prints as well.

How'd you get started?

We met while at school for graphic design, worked for a few years in the design industry, then decided one day that we wanted to do/make things ourselves. There wasn't any one person around us that we can think of that was inspiring us to set out on our own, but we have both always been very self sufficient. Making, creating, seeking, and learning new things comes very naturally to us both, so we probably would have ended up right where we are no matter what.

 

Tell us a little about your Process.

Our process probably always begins away from the computer. We love being outdoors exploring, so when you see our work, the connection is there, even if in small amounts. From there, pretty much everything starts with pencil or pen on paper before being transferred to the computer for making a few changes. All the materials we source are from other companies located in the US and they meet our quality demands that we try to maintain. We use water-based ink when screen printing because they are eco friendly and better for Scott's health since he's the one printing all day.


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

We're passionate about living simply and making products that are of really high quality, that will last. We like paying attention to all the details, so we always like to include our illustration work into the graphics we use for the fabrics on our products.

 

Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

Jacqui: I've always wanted a kiln so I could fire my own ceramics.
Scott: Possibly expanding upon the things we already make.

 

 

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Sarah bak pottery

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Don’t make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, don’t hesitate to make it beautiful. – Shaker Philosophy

 

Meet Sarah Bak Pottery

and the potter and multiple task juggler of the same name.

(Sarah Bak)


 

Where do you make the wonderful things you make so wonderfully?

I work out of my cozy home studio in NE Seattle, and often run down to check on drying pots or a cooling kiln, late at night in my pj’s.

 

What do you make?

Functional pottery made with porcelain clay, created to bring a bit of beauty into objects you use every day. Hand thrown items include mugs, bowls of many sizes and functions, garlic jars, French butter dishes, spoon rests, vases, teapots.

 

How'd you get started?

In college, I was torn between a love of art and science. Regarding art, I always appreciated art objects that had functionality. With ceramics, I realized I could have the best of both worlds. A summer apprenticeship with an established potter in Wisconsin got me started on the path. My first assignment from him was to make 100 cups, which took all summer, but I was hooked after that. It also gave me the muscle memory that a potter needs to grow in order to make other forms. That was over 20 years ago…

 

Tell us a little about your Process.

Most items are hand thrown of porcelain clay on the potter’s wheel, while some are constructed out of slabs of clay. They are then painted and incised in designs inspired by nature, although some pieces have stamped designs highlighted with bright colored glazes. The stamps on these pieces have been either designed or hand carved by me. Every pot goes through two kiln firings, the final reaching a temperature of 2165 degrees.
Porcelain is my clay of choice, because it is such a nice white canvas for painting. I love to use under glazes for painting, because they behave much like watercolors, once they are fired.


Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

Don’t make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, don’t hesitate to make it beautiful. – Shaker Philosophy
While this doesn’t apply to my work 100%, since not everything is necessary it is something that I keep in the back of my mind. The part about “don’t hesitate to make it beautiful” is what stands out the most. If you are going to have things (and who doesn’t) they should be items that you appreciate, use and enjoy.


Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

Knitting, just for fun. I can crochet, but would love to learn to knit. Printmaking is another area I am recently interested in. Learning to hand carve stamps has been so fun and useful, but has also given me more appreciation for wood and linocuts.

 

Anything else you’d like everyone to know?

Besides being a potter, you can often find me chasing around my two kids. Other interests include cooking, kayaking, skiing, hiking and movie watching.

 

 

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LilyEmme Jewelry

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I believe in living simply and I try to express that with my work with simply and elegantly designed jewelry.

 

Meet LilyEmme Jewelry

and Designer and Owner Valerie Madison.

 

 

Where do you make the wonderful things you make so wonderfully?

In my home studio in downtown Seattle.

Wanna see? Click on the photo of her workspace to the left.

 

What do you make?

Jewelry, specifically Metalwork and Gemstone Jewelry using reclaimed metals and ethically sourced gemstones.

 

Briefly tell us about how you got started in your field:

Making jewelry was not in my master plan, but after dabbling in jewelry while in college I fell in love and taught myself how to make all kinds of jewelry. A few year into my new hobby, I enrolled in a metalsmithing course and fell even more in love with this art form.

 

Tell us a little about your Process, what kind of materials you use, and why:

I try to minimize my foot print by utilizing a small workspace at home and using as few chemicals as possible. Most important to me are where my materials are sourced from so I make sure to purchase only from the best sources with a reputation for quality and sustainability.

 

Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work? What are you passionate about?

I believe in living simply and I try to express that with my work with simply and elegantly designed jewelry.

 

Are there any other crafts you’d like to try your hand at someday?

I do occasionally paint with watercolors when I have some free time. I’d love to be able to do more of that when I find balance in my schedule.

 

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Camp smartypants

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Laugh with your friends, explore new terrain
and follow your heart.

 

Meet CAMP SMARTYPANTS

and its founder, Rachel Beyer.

 

 

Where do you make the wonderful things you make so wonderfully?

I make everything for Camp Smartypants in my home studio in Portland, Oregon.

 

What kind of products do you make?

I make colorful art prints, greeting cards, buttons, pins, and jewelry.

 

Briefly tell us about how you got started in your field:

I started Camp Smartypants in the summer of 2009. After studying graphic design at The Art Institute of Seattle and working my first ‘real job’ I longed to step away from the computer and get back to making things. I moved home to Portland and started doing just that. I opened my Etsy shop in June selling a few greeting cards, tie-dye shoulder bags and headbands.

 

Tell us a little about your Process, what kind of materials you use, and why:

I love variety in my making process and enjoy using a lot of different mediums. I use a combination of watercolor, acrylic and the computer to create my art, greeting cards and buttons. I love collecting recycled embroidery floss, twigs, vintage and found beads, and feathers to make my jewelry. My grandmother is a quilter so I also love getting out my sewing machine to make garlands and zipper pouches.

 

Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work? What are you passionate about?

Camp Smartypants is inspired by my childhood memories of summer camp adventures. I believe we are all young at heart and should hold onto out childlike innocence. We are never too old to climb a tree, invent a new language or imagine the impossible. I hope that my products inspire others to rekindle those fun magical memories. Laugh with your friends, explore new terrain and follow your heart.

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Future Features

Here are some Artists we're happy to have in store. We're adding more all the time, so be sure to come on in!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A Tea Leaf
Bunny Bear Press

Catshy Crafts
Camp SmartyPants

Cheeky Kumquat
Christine Stoll Jewelry

Cotton Wells Baby
Ephemera

Fremont Candle Co.
Heidi Rose Artworks

Huck & Jo
Jen Forland Designs

Jeni Ro Designs

Jolene Thayer

Kitten Mittens

Kathy Thompson
Kattywompus
Little Green

Manor Candle

Mayhem Here


Mia Yoshihara-Bradshaw

Mouton (Garden BonBons)
Mrs Robinson's Affair

Nate's Mommy Made it!

Petals in Metal

Recipe4Cute

Rockabella Bags
Sarah Bak Pottery

Scroll Hand*bound

Sunday Drive Designs
Seattle Soap Shop

SlideSideways

Susan Milke
The Playful Potter

Thyme+Season

Torch Illumination
Traci Bixby

Yardia

YearRound Co.

& So, There Exclusives

 

 

 

 

 

 

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